Big Nellie, benefits the bold

  Looking SE towards Harrington, Crowdy Bay National Park and the Pacific Ocean Big Nellie, Coorabakh National Park, New South Wales, Australia

Looking SE towards Harrington, Crowdy Bay National Park and the Pacific Ocean Big Nellie, Coorabakh National Park, New South Wales, Australia

  Some of the steeper climbs are avoided by taking routes that traverse the slope to gain the upper levels

Some of the steeper climbs are avoided by taking routes that traverse the slope to gain the upper levels

Australia's Eastern Seaboard is backed by the Great Dividing Range, the third longest range of mountains in the world. At the time of their creation they would have been formidable. Some suggest they may have been taller than the Himalayas. Today, 300 million years on, erosion has reduced them to remnants of their former size. Yet every now and then there is a peak that still stands proud of all others around it, to provide spectacular vistas.

Big Nellie, is one such peak. Now a humble 542m above sea level, this volcanic mountain provides a challenging scramble, often on all fours, to access her peak. For those with a good level of fitness and decent shoes the climb is manageable with some care, in dry conditions. In the wet, it would be a very different story, particularly when descending. National Parks advise that it only be attempted by experienced climbers.

For those reaching the peak, the rewards are 360 degree views as far as the eye can see.

© Robert Oates | BALLANTYNE Photography Travel and Events Photography and Editorials

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